Counselling for children and teenagers

Counselling Children and Teenagers

How can counselling help?

Are you worried that your child is struggling? Counselling for Children and Teenagers is now widely accepted as beneficial. It can provide a safe place to talk and be heard without judgement away from their usual circles.

Active Thinking ... our blog

The Love Trap

I’ve been bad :( It’s mental health awareness week again and I realise I haven’t posted for ages :(( In fact while I'm kicking myself, I’ve also been eating too much sugar and I haven’t done enough exercise, the car needs washing and ... :(((( I can feel my head...

Who needs feelings anyway?

Someone once described emotions as lights on our dashboard. They indicate that something needs our attention under the hood. We can ignore the light, turn it off, even break it. We may be able to carry on for a while, maybe indefinitely limp along, but is it safe and are we the best us that we can be? The problem doesn’t go away unless we look at it.

And…how are you?

This time of year there are traditionally two strong messages circulating from all corners of society.

The Anxious Child

WARNING: the following post is NOT yet another reason to feel like a bad parent. No need to grit your teeth in anguish as you anticipate being shown yet another error in your ways. If your child is fed, deflead and relatively clean, had a real vegetable at some point...

What sort of problems bring children and teenagers to counselling?

In some cases it might not be obvious, it is just your sense as a parent that tells you child is struggling. The list below is not exhaustive but covers a number of reasons parents look into counselling for their child.

• Long periods of sadness, tearfulness, or depression

• Behavioural problems such as; excessive anger, acting out, bedwetting or not getting on at school

• Social withdrawal or isolation

• Being the victim of bullying or bullying other children

• Decreased interest in previously enjoyed activities

• mood swings (e.g., happy one minute, upset the next)

• Increase in physical complaints, headaches, tummy ache

• Management of a serious, acute, or chronic illness

• Experiencing significant loss or change such as following death of a loved one, separation, divorce, or house move.

Does my child need to see a Counsellor?

Perhaps it has been suggested to you by family, friends, teacher or GP that your child may benefit from some counselling. Or perhaps you have noticed a change in your child’s behaviour, reactions and emotions, that are not going away or are worsening.

It can be very helpful for a child to have a confidential space to explore how they are feeling and learn new ways to feel comfortable within themselves.

What is children’s counselling?

As with adults the most important starting point is the relationship between the child and counsellor. The counsellor will listen without judgement and provide a safe environment for your child to spend some time identifying what they are struggling with.

Young children often explore and recognise their feelings and difficulties through the medium of play. This can involve, games, art, sand play, writing stories and play with puppets. Often a child will find it easier to explain how a character in their story is feeling. These methods all give the counsellor a great insight into the unconscious mind of the child.

Older children often prefer talking therapy where they can talk about their feelings freely without judgement or risk they may be hurting the counsellors feelings.

Counselling children and teenagers is not about advice-giving or influencing decisions. It often doesn’t provide the child with the answers or solutions, what it can provide is and opportunity for exploration and understanding. I do through the development of a supportive relationship built on trust. I agree confidentiality with the child and will only break that confidentiality if the child is considered to be at risk of harm to themselves or others.

Many parents are keen to discuss what happens in sessions, it is important to protect the confidentiality agreement with the child so this would only happen with the child’s consent. It can often be difficult for parents wondering what is being said in sessions. Please be assured I am there to work with your child not to judge or talk about what may be happening within your family.

I am very happy to meet with parents at the start of therapy as a free consultation.This allows time to ask questions which you may have regarding my practice and experience and for you to raise your concerns about your child. This will also give your child a chance to meet me and see the room.

Useful Resources

Young Minds – 0808 802 5544
http://www.youngminds.org.uk/

Childline – 08001111
http://www.childline.org.uk/

NSPCC – 0800 800 5000
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

Happy Children
Counselling Children and Teenagers

What sort of problems bring children and teenagers to counselling?

In some cases it might not be obvious, it is just your sense as a parent that tells you child is struggling. The list below is not exhaustive but covers a number of reasons parents look into counselling for their child.

• Long periods of sadness, tearfulness, or depression

• Behavioural problems such as; excessive anger, acting out, bedwetting or not getting on at school

• Social withdrawal or isolation

• Being the victim of bullying or bullying other children

• Decreased interest in previously enjoyed activities

• mood swings (e.g., happy one minute, upset the next)

• Increase in physical complaints, headaches, tummy ache

• Management of a serious, acute, or chronic illness

• Experiencing significant loss or change such as following death of a loved one, separation, divorce, or house move.

Does my child need to see a Counsellor?

Perhaps it has been suggested to you by family, friends, teacher or GP that your child may benefit from some counselling. Or perhaps you have noticed a change in your child’s behaviour, reactions and emotions, that are not going away or are worsening.

It can be very helpful for a child to have a confidential space to explore how they are feeling and learn new ways to feel comfortable within themselves.

What is children’s counselling?

As with adults the most important starting point is the relationship between the child and counsellor. The counsellor will listen without judgement and provide a safe environment for your child to spend some time identifying what they are struggling with.

Young children often explore and recognise their feelings and difficulties through the medium of play. This can involve, games, art, sand play, writing stories and play with puppets. Often a child will find it easier to explain how a character in their story is feeling. These methods all give the counsellor a great insight into the unconscious mind of the child.

Older children often prefer talking therapy where they can talk about their feelings freely without judgement or risk they may be hurting the counsellors feelings.

Counselling children and teenagers is not about advice-giving or influencing decisions. It often doesn’t provide the child with the answers or solutions, what it can provide is and opportunity for exploration and understanding. I do through the development of a supportive relationship built on trust. I agree confidentiality with the child and will only break that confidentiality if the child is considered to be at risk of harm to themselves or others.

Many parents are keen to discuss what happens in sessions, it is important to protect the confidentiality agreement with the child so this would only happen with the child’s consent. It can often be difficult for parents wondering what is being said in sessions. Please be assured I am there to work with your child not to judge or talk about what may be happening within your family.

I am very happy to meet with parents at the start of therapy as a free consultation.This allows time to ask questions which you may have regarding my practice and experience and for you to raise your concerns about your child. This will also give your child a chance to meet me and see the room.

How can counselling help?

Are you worried that your child is struggling? Counselling for Children and Teenagers is now widely accepted as beneficial. It can provide a safe place to talk and be heard without judgement away from their usual circles.

Useful Resources

Young Minds – 0808 802 5544
http://www.youngminds.org.uk/

Childline – 08001111
http://www.childline.org.uk/

NSPCC – 0800 800 5000
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

Happy Children

Active Thinking ... our blog

The Love Trap

I’ve been bad :( It’s mental health awareness week again and I realise I haven’t posted for ages :(( In fact while I'm kicking myself, I’ve also been eating too much sugar and I haven’t done enough exercise, the car needs washing and ... :(((( I can feel my head...

Who needs feelings anyway?

Someone once described emotions as lights on our dashboard. They indicate that something needs our attention under the hood. We can ignore the light, turn it off, even break it. We may be able to carry on for a while, maybe indefinitely limp along, but is it safe and are we the best us that we can be? The problem doesn’t go away unless we look at it.

And…how are you?

This time of year there are traditionally two strong messages circulating from all corners of society.

The Anxious Child

WARNING: the following post is NOT yet another reason to feel like a bad parent. No need to grit your teeth in anguish as you anticipate being shown yet another error in your ways. If your child is fed, deflead and relatively clean, had a real vegetable at some point...

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